Explanation of Branding

When you think of a great brand, what comes to mind? Some of the most valuable brands in the world today include Google, Microsoft, Coca Cola, IBM, McDonalds, Apple, and China Mobile1. These companies have successfully built brand equity and are well established in consumer’s minds. But who are their customers? Are they individuals, or are they other companies? Your target consumer determines your brand strategy, and there are key differences when branding for business-to-business (B2B) as opposed to business-to-consumer (B2C) companies. The key difference between individuals and businesses as consumers involves how purchasing decisions are made-businesses make purchase decisions collectively with multiple decision makers. Therefore, general awareness and knowledge of B2B brands in the marketplace absolutely essential. This article will examine the importance of branding for B2B companies and look at a few ways to build a strong B2B brand.

B2B Brand Differentiation

Many B2B companies have not effectively differentiated their brand from others. For example, the audit firms formerly known as the “Big Five” initially did not manage to differentiate themselves from one other. A survey conducted by Price Waterhouse Coopers at the time of their merger showed that “the business community and the general public did not perceive any compelling differences between and among the Big Five. Not only did all firms appear to have similar defining qualities, they were also not sending any consistent message about their organisations to external audiences.” 2 “Around 10 years later, the situation remains the same. Although KPMG, Ernst & Young, Deloitte, and PWC all provide similar services, each firm is proficient in different areas. Due to a lack of focus on branding, the differentiating points of these large B2B audit companies are often not apparent in the B2B marketplace.

An example of a differentiated B2B brand is Dell computers. Dell has not only utilized an innovative business model, they have always communicated to consumers and business the factors that make their brand different. For example, Dell was one of the first computer companies to allow customers to custom-configure and purchase computers online. For their B2B clients, Dell offers extensive Enterprise Resource Planning systems and e-commerce solutions. At the beginning of 2008 Dell launched a revised services-and-support scheme for businesses named “ProSupport” which offers more options to companies to tailor Dell services to fit their specific needs. Although there are many competitors providing computer solutions in the B2B environment, Dell has been a very popular choice over the last few years because they consistently abide by their brand promise to deliver customized product and service offerings, timely delivery, and reasonable prices.

Moving from a House of Brands to a Branded House

One way a B2B company can strengthen their brand is by moving from a “house of brands” to a “branded house”. An example of a house of brands would be Procter and Gamble, who possess many brands within an overall portfolio. Consumers may not necessary connect the individual brands within the portfolio to the Procter and Gamble corporation. On the other hand, a branded house is when brands use a single name across all products and services, like the Virgin Group. Virgin brands are too numerous to list here, but some include Virgin Airlines, Virgin Records, Virgin Media, Virgin Money, and more.